How We’re Doing This Travel Thing

By Emily*

This post is going to focus around a lot of the questions we get, as well as an overview of what the trip is like from a day-to-day perspective. If you have a question for us that isn’t answered here, go ahead and ask!

“Why are you doing this?”

Short answer: We both love traveling.

Long answer: After experiencing Japan for the first time during a trip in 2016, Ethan was eager to return (and add a few other Asian nations to the itinerary). I hadn’t been on a trip longer than one or two weeks since 2010. We spent a few months discussing the pro’s and con’s (mostly the pro’s) and deciding how/when we’d be able to undertake a long term trip.

A few factors in our decision to travel now, versus later: we’re both at an age/life stage where we don’t mind “rougher” living situations (hostels, walking all day, etc); we were both ready to leave our current jobs and experience something different for a while; we don’t have too many responsibilities (like mortgages, kids, school, etc) that could affect future travel plans.

“How are you paying for this?”

When we made the decision to undertake a year-long adventure, it was about a year in advance of our planned departure date. We read a lot of travel blog posts online about how different travelers budgeted for such a journey, and came up with the figure of $10,000 each for a year of travel. We spent the year saving money, adjusting for planned expenses (phone bills, travel insurance, etc) and researching cheap travel tips (as well as Workaway and CouchSurfing). Currently, we both make money while traveling via remote working – I write articles for BabyNameWizard, and Ethan advises high school students applying to college via email and Skype. We’ve also adjusted our length of trip from “one year” to “when the money runs out” – we would rather have more flexibility/comfort now than prolonging an uncomfortable trip.

“How did you plan ahead?”

Internet! It is easier than ever to find destination recommendations, cheap flight websites, and free daily itineraries in almost every language for every country. Travel blogs written by people like us (millennial Westerners without an infinite sum of money) have been incredibly helpful. We also depend a lot on WikiTravel, Google Maps, and Reddit. Being who I am, I’ve made quite a few spreadsheets to keep track of flights and hostels, what to pack, and weekly plans (when necessary).

“Why are you traveling in Asia?”

Ethan was the impetus for this decision – being an amateur scholar of Japanese history and language (#weeaboo) and working with recent Chinese immigrants to the United States sparked his curiosity to explore these particular countries. When we started researching travel plans, we found that adding Southeast Asia to our trip wouldn’t be too difficult once we were already in the “area” (continent).

While my travel experience prior to this has been in the US and Europe, I was eager to expand my knowledge on a part of the world that I’ve learned very little about. There’s also not many places in the world to which I *wouldn’t* go – I’ve got one life, might as well use it to explore all there is to see!

“What’s in your backpack?”

Probably too much. I’m currently using Flight 001 bags to organize everything, so at least it’s not all in a jumble. Here’s a quick run down:

  • Clothes: Three dresses, four tops, two undershirts, skirt, jeans, belt, leggings, shorts, pajama shirt/shorts, swimsuit, sweater, scarf, two pairs of socks, three bras, five underwears (ExOfficio is amazing!!), Birkenstock sandals, tennis shoes
  • Electronics: Laptop (MacBook Air), iPhone, mobile charger, charging cords, international outlet adapters, earbuds
  • Toiletries: deodorant, lotion (doubles as styling product), acne cream, face wash, toothbrush/toothpaste, floss, tweezers, mascara, lipstick, sunscreen
  • Medical kit: ibuprofen, band-aids, tampons (which are incredibly hard to find in Asia!!!), anti-malaria pills, antidepressants (I stocked up on a year’s worth in advance)
  • Documents: passport, driver’s license, immunization record, visa paperwork
  • Miscellaneous: quick-dry towel, sewing kit, travel blanket and pillow, tissues, pens/notebooks, reusable utensils, safety pins, lint roller, inflatable hanger, rain poncho, umbrella, mini combination locks, hair elastics, laundry soap packets

Being able to carry everything I own feels limiting in some ways but liberating in others. For example, I’m not very into fashion, but I really miss wearing more than three different outfits and putting on makeup when I want to. On the other hand, I’m always very proud when I find ways to use my limited tools to solve problems – tweezers and safety pins are surprisingly versatile!

“What do you do every day?”

It depends on the day!

  • Travel days – Going between cities usually involves either a bus, train, or plane. On these days, we pack up and check out of our hostel/Workaway, then spend a few hours schlepping our gear through turnstiles and subway stations. Once we arrive at the new location, we check into our hostel/Workaway, and usually rest. These days are sweaty and very tiring, so we don’t usually get to do much sightseeing.
  • Workaway days – We wake up, eat breakfast, and work for a few hours. Then we spend the rest of the day checking out the local sites or relaxing until dinner. Naps are often involved, as is socializing with other workers. Check out my post on Workaway here.
  • “Work days” – I usually sit in a quiet air-conditioned room and write a baby name article (with occasional bouts of procrastinating on Sporcle). Ethan will follow up with students via email or hold Skype meetings (with occasional bouts of procrastinating on news websites). We also use these days to plan travel logistics, such as buying bus/train tickets, creating itineraries for cities, or contacting Workaways we want to go to in the future.
  • Sightseeing days – We walk, look at things, and sweat. Well, a little bit more goes into it: we usually come up with a route or neighborhood of a city that contains a few sites we’re interested in. This can include museums, statues, parks, shopping streets, monuments, cool buildings, and temples. While we’re walking through it, we take a lot of pictures and usually embarrass ourselves in one way or another. We’ll also try to sample the local cuisine!

*Because this is written by Emily, some facets of Ethan’s travel experience are not included (obviously). Feel free to message him directly if you have questions for him!

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